Tag Archives: student voice

Student Voice: WRDSB TED-ED Clubs Online

The  WRDSB Ted-Ed clubs presentation archive from  June 7, 2017 at Vista Hills Public School in Waterloo, Ontario is now online.

Enjoy these “ideas worth spreading” !!!  #studentvoice 

A special thanks to organizers Megan Lowe,  Tania Bumstead and Elke Baumgartner, Andrew Bieronski and also Stephen Hurley for his support to broadcast the live event on  on  VoicEd Radio .

~Mark

Synergy for Change

I thoroughly enjoyed my time at the  ConnectEd 2017  conference this week, and certainly enjoyable to see so many wonderful people in my PLN face to face for conversations.

A personal highlight included the opportunity to present two different sessions with  Jamie Reaburn Weir.  In this post, I am sharing the resources we prepared for this Dell sponsored session which focused on setting a context  for tackling barriers for change.

Note:  This video was prepared from the  Livestream  archive.

~Mark

Going 1 to 1 Panel Discussion

Last week I had the privilege of attending the 2017 Educational Technology Strategy Summit to share the WRDSB “going 1:1” journey in a panel discussion presentation.

The discussion was moderated by teacher  Andrew Bieronski.  I was joined on the panel by  Ed Doadt (Principal),  Jamie Reaburn (teacher), students Tara and Brooke.

The discussion was well received, noting that there were many positive comments about the journey, the sharing of research and observations and including student voices in the session.

Have a listen: 

Session sketchnote: 

Resources:

Conference Twitter Stream:  #edutech17

~Mark

Student Feedback 1 to 1

I thought I would share some student feedback on their experiences with our 1 to 1 pilot project this year on the final day of the 15/16 school year.

“Another component of this course that completely differs from my previous year is the use of technology. Everyday, we were fortunate enough to use the chromebooks provided by the school rather than write with pencil and paper. Although, at the beginning I was very reluctant to have the entire course essentially online, I was able to develop my skills with computers and different programs we used throughout the semester.” – MP

“At the beginning of the coarse when i found out we were doing the coarse online and on chrome books everyday….I did not like the thought of it at all because I’m pretty horrible with computers and such. After this semester I now am capable to make a website and transition to using google docs all the time now for everything.” – KP

“Everything we did this semester was digital, meaning I did not use a single piece of paper. I really liked this aspect of the course, as I found it was easier to remain organized, and on-top of assignments. The google classroom was a bonus because it allowed me to work through multiple assignments simultaneously. Overall, I think in the current time period it makes sense for every English course to operate this was, and I’m really happy that I was able to experience this type of course two years in a row.” – MG

“For the entire semester, our class used Google Chromebooks to complete work and participate in class discussions. Not once this semester did I have to pull out a piece of paper (which was nice). Based on my experience, this is the way that all English classrooms should be like in the future.” -SP

“The daily use of technology was new to me for an ENG course. Initially, I was skeptical of its usefulness, and even feared that it would interfere with my ability to do rough work, because I was so accustomed to paper-and-pen work. However, the use of technology was majorly useful. I very much enjoyed the access to an instant and limitless dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, library, and on and on. I am convinced my work was better for having access to these things, especially the first two items of that list.” – SN

“I enjoyed that the course was very technology based with everyone having a chrome book to work on. I feel it makes life a lot easier when all of my work can be accessed from anywhere and can be handed in from anywhere.” – LB

“Although the technology portion of this course was new to me and took a little getting used to, it was one of my favourite parts of this course. Learning through the source of technology was a good way to keep teens of our generation focused on learning in the classroom. Having all/most assignments online and easy to access was really helpful when working at home or somewhere aways from school grounds. Also being able to hand in assignments online was easier for me personally because I liked having the night of the due date to finalize my writing or slideshow before turning it in. “

I look forward to launching our 1:1 program across all secondary schools in September!

~Mark
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Remembrance Day Service 2015

This year the WRDSB Education Centre staff will be connecting with Cameron Heights C. I. to view the Remembrance Day service planned by the staff and students.

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The video stream will be active from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. for the two assemblies which will run 8:20 – 9:15  and  9:20 – 10:15.

Click [here] to join the stream. (Note: free account needed for viewing.)

~Mark

Rethinking Learning Spaces

I closed out the week by collaborating with  Jamie Reaburn Weir and  Alanna King  for  an insightful conversation on redesigning learning spaces.

I think you will appreciate the viewpoints and early observations they share from their work in this area.

I wonder what you will explore?

~Mark

Let Them Choose

During my ongoing curation of articles about learning, digital tools and social media, I recently came across this article exploring perspectives on  social media in the lecture theatres.  Although the article was primarily examining post secondary perspectives, I would argue the same discussions are relevant in K12. The discussion was centred around various viewpoints on whether or not students:

  • be allowed (by profs) to bring technology to class
  • are distracted by having access to social media  and
  • experience benefits?

Two interviewees interviewed commented that “… because the students are most likely taking notes. Many don’t use pen and paper, and rely on their devices. She says students are old enough to decide if they are to learn or not.” andMy view is they are old enough to choose and multitask (and choose to fail too),“. Meanwhile, others choose to dictate “no access”.

SM choices

Now, if I put a personal perspective on this and let you observe my learning mode,  this is what you would see. Typically I use 2 devices … taking notes on my iPad using notability – not just for notes – adding audio recording, and insert photos for context for a more complete package.  On the second device I organize lists, todos, ideas and share via social media, typically Twitter but this could easily be a Facebook group, G+ community, LinkedIn or open Google doc. I reiterate – this is MY style. This is how I learn best. Paper and pen doesn’t work for me.

device choice

Why not let students choose what works best for them – student voice. To me,  letting students choose what tools they use and how they organize shows a strength based approach to student learning. What benefit is there in forcing students to function in a way that may not be self directed and self optimized?

Weigh in:  Where do you stand?

~Mark