Category Archives: Leadership Perspective

CNIE 2017 Presentation Resource

I enjoyed the opportunity to present  The Art of Teaching in a Fast-Changing World  yesterday with  Alison Bullock  at the CNIE 2017 conference in Banff.   Our session resources are included in this post.

Video of Presentation:

~Mark

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Going 1 to 1 Panel Discussion

Last week I had the privilege of attending the 2017 Educational Technology Strategy Summit to share the WRDSB “going 1:1” journey in a panel discussion presentation.

The discussion was moderated by teacher  Andrew Bieronski.  I was joined on the panel by  Ed Doadt (Principal),  Jamie Reaburn (teacher), students Tara and Brooke.

The discussion was well received, noting that there were many positive comments about the journey, the sharing of research and observations and including student voices in the session.

Have a listen: 

Session sketchnote: 

Resources:

Conference Twitter Stream:  #edutech17

~Mark

Knowledge Mobilization Context – a response

A couple of weeks ago  Donna Miller Fry  blogged about open education leadership, exploring the question: Is knowledge more rapidly mobilized through the system when leaders work openly?

Her post begins “For the purposes of my work, I am considering personal professional openness – the concept of sharing thinking and learning in open spaces, curating resources for others, engaging in open conversations in text or through broadcast technologies like podcasts, videos and YouTube Live, blogging and commenting on blogs, and participating across the educational boundaries in wider conversations across the web. Working open” means different things in different contexts …”   You can read Donna’s full blog post [here] .

In my view, this is a well written post, and as is typical of Donna, she invites further comment and discussion.  I have been mulling over my thinking on this topic since reading the post and decided to share my response as another blog post.

I fully believe in open learning, sharing and question asking,  and do my best to model this in my own practice.  My experience, and I believe that of many, is that the personal value of being a connected professional, connected learner, and engaged in global conversations is truly boundless learning.  Yet, Donna’s post has prompted me to do some deeper thinking about context of open learning and knowledge mobilization.

My thinking on this has moved to a triangulation model of open learning, conditions & culture  and purpose/focus with knowledge mobilization at the centre.

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The question for me is what brings knowledge mobilization to life beyond personal growth and interest?

openness: sharing thinking, learning and questions openly – publicly in digital forums

conditions & culture: innovation and creativity – an interest and receptiveness in moving positions and growth

focus: alignment to a purpose or goal  (beyond self)

Applying knowledge mobilization strategies to system
system change is often a task faced by large organizations, including school boards.  The open learning model that Donna describes in her post I believe is a key element in change:  learning openly from others, leveraging the “global room” of the digital world,  bringing new ideas and  experiences to the table,  challenging  and adjusting thinking and landing solidly on the right place to promote, activate and execute system change.

Mobilizing knowledge through to a system requires a certain receptiveness, a level of readiness, a plan.  In my view, a culture that embraces innovation and creativity is needed or must be created to truly embrace change.  This process takes time, but is important. If this is missing, the pace of change – time needed for the process will undoubtedly be extended, perhaps less impactful or worse, not achieved at all.

Finally, meshing open learning to a culture of change, innovation and creativity then applying it to a strategic focus or goal amplifies the entire process.  The strategic focus may be drastic such as a company reinventing itself to “stay alive” in the business world, or perhaps the focus is change one or more elements in an education system. No the less, understanding the need and target for the change process must be well understood.

I believe the triangulation approach creates purpose and amplification for planned change.

Your thoughts?

~Mark
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Resources from BIT16 Presentation

This post shares the resources from the Digital Leadership presentation I did with  Ed DoadtPrincipal at Huron Heights Secondary School, Waterloo Region District School Board.

Slide Deck:

Podcast:

Digital Leadership – What Matters, session survey results

screen-shot-2016-11-13-at-11-50-26-am

We hope you will connect on Twitter for further discussion or consider leaving comments here on the blog.

~Mark
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Leadership Journey

In her blog post  Not All Who Wander are Lost, a Lesson in Leadership,  Tina Zita writes

… “It’s hard to give yourself that permission to wander, the permission to not take the standard path set out. Education seems to have a pretty clear pathway for leadership: step 1 leads to step 2 leads to step 3, the quicker the better. Like the city walls, they become a constant reminder of a common path I haven’t chosen to take yet. Sometimes wandering feels uncomfortable.” …

This analogy of clearing one’s mind, taking time to simply be and explore the non traditional path really resonates with me.

Personal growth is an individualized journey. I do not believe the journey is simply a long sequence of pre-planned, must follow steps – arguably, hoops to jump through.  Perhaps our professional learning looks (or should like) more like the diagram on the right  which is often used to describe student learning.

learning_is_messy

Taking time to clear your mind,  unclutter thinking, unlearn, explore options, different paths and new viewpoints IS the journey.

As  Donna Miller Fry  recently tweeted,

Take time to wander!  What will your personal professional learning journey look like?

~Mark
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Read Tina’s blog

‘messy image from  http://www.conferencesthatwork.com/index.php/learning/2012/04/learning-is-messy/

Music Ed Then, Now and Change

I really enjoyed my recent conversation with Jane Gingerich, head of music at Southwood Secondary School where we examined music education then and now, leveraging technology and change. I think you will find the perspectives interesting.

Interview

Examples of theory instructional videos

~Mark
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A Case for Change

As a frequent blog reader and online content curator, I am fascinated by the idea of synchronicity in reading.   One interesting example of this happened last week when I read a new blog post by Donna Miller Fry,  came across a connected reference by  Seth Godin  posted in my twitter stream (thanks PLN) and had a quote “jump out” at me in a  Flipboard  article.  I thought you might find these articles of interest and perhaps the connections will poke your thinking a bit.

In a recent post titled Emotional Uncertainty in Exponential Times, Donna Miller Fry writes:  “How do we describe and define the intense feelings we experience when we see people we care about, colleagues in our profession, working their fingers to the bone at tasks that just don’t matter anymore?  Exponential change is our reality, yet many of our institutions continue to work hard to be exceptional at what mattered yesterday.”  Read Donna’s full post at  Emotional Uncertainty in Exponential Times

In his post  Teaching Certainty,  Seth Godin writes:  
“Here’s how we’ve organized traditional schooling:  You’re certain to have these classes tomorrow.  The class will certainly … what to do when the certain thing doesn’t happen?”

In my 3rd connection, Andrew Tonner identifies a great Steve Jobs quote in his  Fox Business article  7 Steve Jobs Quotes on Business, Technology and Life.  I felt like this quote jumped out at me:

stevejobsquote

Speed

In reflecting on these 3 interconnected articles,  I wonder , in the context of education, our rapidly changing world and the importance of education being relevant,  if we have enough people  who  truly get it, that really understand innovation, how to change and the need for it and are empowered to take action to change?  I invite your comments and thinking, here by comment or via  @markwcarbone on twitter.

Thanks to Flickr user  GregHeo  for making the creative commons photo available.

~Mark
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