Tag Archives: blogging

Knowledge Mobilization Context – a response

A couple of weeks ago  Donna Miller Fry  blogged about open education leadership, exploring the question: Is knowledge more rapidly mobilized through the system when leaders work openly?

Her post begins “For the purposes of my work, I am considering personal professional openness – the concept of sharing thinking and learning in open spaces, curating resources for others, engaging in open conversations in text or through broadcast technologies like podcasts, videos and YouTube Live, blogging and commenting on blogs, and participating across the educational boundaries in wider conversations across the web. Working open” means different things in different contexts …”   You can read Donna’s full blog post [here] .

In my view, this is a well written post, and as is typical of Donna, she invites further comment and discussion.  I have been mulling over my thinking on this topic since reading the post and decided to share my response as another blog post.

I fully believe in open learning, sharing and question asking,  and do my best to model this in my own practice.  My experience, and I believe that of many, is that the personal value of being a connected professional, connected learner, and engaged in global conversations is truly boundless learning.  Yet, Donna’s post has prompted me to do some deeper thinking about context of open learning and knowledge mobilization.

My thinking on this has moved to a triangulation model of open learning, conditions & culture  and purpose/focus with knowledge mobilization at the centre.

mk-triangulation

The question for me is what brings knowledge mobilization to life beyond personal growth and interest?

openness: sharing thinking, learning and questions openly – publicly in digital forums

conditions & culture: innovation and creativity – an interest and receptiveness in moving positions and growth

focus: alignment to a purpose or goal  (beyond self)

Applying knowledge mobilization strategies to system
system change is often a task faced by large organizations, including school boards.  The open learning model that Donna describes in her post I believe is a key element in change:  learning openly from others, leveraging the “global room” of the digital world,  bringing new ideas and  experiences to the table,  challenging  and adjusting thinking and landing solidly on the right place to promote, activate and execute system change.

Mobilizing knowledge through to a system requires a certain receptiveness, a level of readiness, a plan.  In my view, a culture that embraces innovation and creativity is needed or must be created to truly embrace change.  This process takes time, but is important. If this is missing, the pace of change – time needed for the process will undoubtedly be extended, perhaps less impactful or worse, not achieved at all.

Finally, meshing open learning to a culture of change, innovation and creativity then applying it to a strategic focus or goal amplifies the entire process.  The strategic focus may be drastic such as a company reinventing itself to “stay alive” in the business world, or perhaps the focus is change one or more elements in an education system. No the less, understanding the need and target for the change process must be well understood.

I believe the triangulation approach creates purpose and amplification for planned change.

Your thoughts?

~Mark
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Voice – Have You Found Yours?

Last week I had a fantastic opportunity to hear flamenco guitarist David Sinclair perform in a quaint house setting thanks to friends Bob and Jan.  As  you might anticipate, the performance was fabulous and so great to hear in that setting.  David provided some interesting insights into the music history and style to set the context for each piece.

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One  of the introductions really struck a chord with me.  As he talked about progressing as performer, David shared that one of his teachers challenged him to accomplish more:  be a great performer, but find your voice, write and perform your own music as well – leave your own legacy.

There is was: the importance of  “find your voice“.  Thanks David.

Given the number of conversations  in education about finding your voice and sharing learning openly, and a new school year just around the corner, perhaps this was a happy coincidence.  Or perhaps it was an “ignite moment”  to encourage us (educators) to take steps or continue a commitment to support open learning and sharing.

Blog!

September is coming.  Are in you in? 

~Mark
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Creative Commons Photo Credit (blog graphic) to Flickr user  ginaballerina

Blogging from the Start – part 2

Edu Gridlock Part 2:

In Blogging from the Start I wrote about an innovative pre-service teacher program where blogging played a key role in the personal development of these teachers.

Fast forward to May 2016 where I had a chance to team up with Helen DeWaard (@hj_dewaard) and Donna Fry (@fryed) to hosting a discussion forum at the Faculties of Education,  Learning and Teaching for Tomorrow event.

FoEDforum

The session context was provided by Helen based on the work she has been doing with her pre-service students through blogging. During the “round room”  discussion, the notions of growth, shift and personal journey were explored by digging into some key questions:

1. What would it take for students to shift from blogging as a course assignment to blogging as a way of professional life?

2. How do we, as a collective, come to grips wiht sharing what you learn vs people/audiences judging what you don’t know or what you learn?

3. What does it really take to personally commit to a culture of open & visible learning and sharing?

4. What is the intrinsic value – why do bloggers keep blogging?

I invite you to listen to the podcast file from the event:

Intros and context > 0-18:40,
Main discussion 18:40 > end (1:05:00)

Blog!

How would you respond to the guiding questions?  I invite your comments or connect on twitter ( @markwcarbone ).

Additional Resources:
Follow Helen on Twitter: @hj_dewaard
Read Helen’s Professional Blog at: Igniting Teaching and Learning
Related Blog Post: Just Make It Public
Creative Commons Photo Credit (blog graphic) to Flickr user  ginaballerina
~Mark
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Blogging from the Start

Edu Gridlock Part 1:

I enjoyed hearing Seán Ó Grádaigh’s (@SeanOGraTek) presentation at the 2016 uLead conference.  In his presentation, Sean shares the journey of preparing pre service teachers for experiences in schools with 1:1 iPad programs.

Throughout the journey, information was gathered about individual technology skills (quite varied), attitudes towards using technology with students, building skills and capacity to use the technology more effectively and changes within these areas. Evidence collected showed significant growth in each of these area.

The interesting twist in the story was the shift to extending the use of the technology to something transformative – tools to capture and document their own (pre service teacher) lessons, experiences and reflections.  With intentional development of new ideas, the students used a variety of tools including facetime, audio (GarageBand), video (iMovie) and writing tools to capture their learnings and reflections in different formats.  iTunes U was used as a platform to share and comment within the class group.

In follow up correspondence, Seán has shared these 2 books which outline  practice:

Digital Reflection on iPad by Seán Ó Grádaigh
MGO ITE Programme by Seán Ó Grádaigh

along with this resource:  The Story of 1916 by Seán Ó Grádaigh
https://itun.es/ie/erY1bb.n

I was impressed that the journey ended with improved skills in using technology to enable better teaching and learning, that attitudes changed and that personal, and professional reflective practice was established in this manner.

In reflection, I note that the use of the Apple environment allows for seamless flow in the process of learning, documenting and sharing.  The notion of using a system that is easy to use, reliable, and has high compatibility is an important consideration in the planning and that there are other ‘device agnostic’ platforms that could accomplish this.

I wonder, what would education look like if this happened in all preservice teacher programs?  Would you change your practice and help move the mountain?

mountainview

~Mark
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Reflections on a Collaborative Blogging Project

It was a pleasure for me  to co-author today’s blog post  with  Donna Miller Fry.   In this post,  we share our amazing experiences with the  OSSEMOOC:  30 days of learning in Ontario collaborative blogging  project.

Enjoy reading our reflections  [here].

~Mark

Your Voice in Connected Learning Professional Practice

Note: My article for today is cross posted from OSSEMOOC: Day 1 of 30 days of learning.

I recently enjoyed a family trip to China in the context of  “the journey home”  for my adopted daughter.   The trip in of itself was simply amazing. I enjoyed going back, seeing the changes and once again experiencing the culture in such an amazing and historic country.

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Given the 1997 timing of my first trip we essentially survived on landline calling cards as public internet access and early versions of email were just springing up around the globe.  On this 2014 trip, of course the internet as matured and there are many amazing and often free collaborative tools available,  so in that sense the trip felt less isolated.

At the same time,  I had a chance to experience the “internet culture” in a much more locked down and filtered government controlled environment.  Tools that we celebrate, use and promote here in North America were simply not available.   Most social media tools were not available including Twitter, Facebook and Google Plus.  Of the Google suite of tools, only gmail and search were available and even these had seemingly limited use.  Gmail seemed to respond very slowly and not all search result  web links were actively available.  I also noted the some, but not all, blogging sites were blocked.  Facetime and Skype worked OK (band width dependent).

The notion of public free wifi as we experience here at locations such as McDonald’s, Tim Horton’s and Starbucks etc. was not wide spread. Yes, the wifi was free but you needed to text your phone number to a service in order to obtain an access code which would be texted back to you.  This is a very different approach to walk in free access for any device culture that is enjoyed in North America.

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Here in Canada, we are blessed with a very open culture and full access to a wide variety of web tools. The bottom line is YOU have a voice – and a choice of tools to use.  Please do not take take this for granted.  Leverage this privilege! Take time and make time to connect with other educators to develop your network and make your thinking visible by sharing your learnings and reflections.  Ask questions,  pose scenarios,  collaborate.  Give yourself a rich experience by starting a blog today!

Related Resources:
Reference 1:  Perspective from the Wall
Reference 2: #OSSEMOOC 30 days of learning

~Mark

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