Tag Archives: @markwcarbone

CMA: Connecting more dots

Yesterday I had a chance to hear Simon Breakspear (@simonbreakspear) deliver his “Learning Redesigned” presentation. I thought the dive into deeper learning for all, and HOW was brilliant and thought provoking.

I have shared a simplified sketch of few key elements of the CMA model from my notability musings.

CMA

I am really interested in what Simon identified as three key aspects of change:  start small,  move fast, and  iterate frequently. Clearly, these are aspects of change that big organizations such as K12 institutions do not excel at.   As I was reflecting on his message over the day, I got to thinking about other connections within the K12 structure.

I don’t see this insight limited to learning and instructional practice. IT departments need to operate in this way too.  I can envision many benefits of striking more quickly with technology change and implementation – especially with the ever increasing rate of digital change.  The rapid iteration notion would apply to developing support models, tweaking networks for optimum performance and perhaps dynamic agile assignment of people resources to deal with trending needs re help-desk support models etc.

I wonder if the real quest is for instructional change & digital change to be working through this process at the same time for a more harmonious, rapid and positive change.

I love the AMPLIFY element of Simon’s model. There is no replacement for nurturing others, starting conversations and sharing your thinking and learning. PERIOD.  As part of the go forward process, in my view it is critical that we, yes we – all of us, take the time to share our experiences in ways that are findable, sharable and provide forums for comments and questions: blogs, videos, chats etc. – we must leverage the learnings from the journeys we each experience.

~Mark

Quest 2014: Innovative Practices

Last week I had the privilege of participating on a panel discussion at the YRDSB’s Quest conference  with Lewis Morgulis (DCDSB) and Russ Coles (YRDSB).  The panel was  moderated by Margaret Roberts (YRDSB).  I appreciate that, with permission,  we were able to livestream and record the session to offer a virtual learning opportunity to other interested educators.

Quest2014_logo

The panel discussion was centred around four guiding questions:

  • What is innovation in a K-12 context?
  • Share an example where innovation has been successfully implemented?
  • What were the elements that made your example successful?
  • What were the challenges?

Watch the panel session.

Following the panel discussion, participants engaged in table discussion guided by the question and statement  set below.

  • What does innovation look like, sound like, feel like?
  • share personal examples
  • How do you engage staff that are resistant to change?
  • How do you build a culture where change is accepted and embraced?
  • Identify barriers and potential solutions

Participants also added comments, ideas and questions to a Today’s Meeting back channel.  I have shared three quotes that resonated with me below.

Russ: thinking outside the box while living in the box

Mary-Anne: innovation starts when we stop accepting the status quo

Donna Miller Fry: (virtually from TBay)  Innovation requires a willingness to be distrubed by M. Wheatley

Do you find these quotes & ideas intriguing?   Check out the full session transcript  [here]  from the Todays Meet  collaboration space.

The closing comment spoke for itself:  As a result of your learning today, what would you do to start to implement this in your own context?

Please share your innovation ideas!

~Mark

BIT14 Presentation Resources

It was a pleasure for me to team up with  Jennifer Paziuk  to present on  Innovative Learning Opportunities. As promised, we are sharing the session resources.

Futures Forum Project -June 28, 2013  from  WRDSB Learning Services  on  Vimeo.

Additional blog articles about the  WRDSB Futures Forum Project.

~Mark & Jennifer

Getting Connected With Purpose

Whether you know me personally, are a reader of this blog or have connected online or F2F,  you know that I am passionate about connected learners needing connected leaders, and this fuels much of the work I do.

Today’s post features a video prepared in collaboration with  Donna Miller Fry  for the  K12 Online Conference  as part of the OSAPAC sponsored  OSSEMOOC  project.  Special thanks to  Silvana Hoxha, Brenda Sherry,  Wayne Toms  and  Ken Whytock  for their willingness to share their getting connected journeys.

 

Related Resource: Fostering Connectivity TEDx Talk

~Mark

WBE workshop session resources

Thank you to those participants who attended my workshop presentations today. As promised, I am sharing the resources:

Conference Twitter feed  #wbecon14

Enjoy a free,  connected, self directed, professional learning experience through  OSSEMOOC  (blog) and/or connect to the OSSEMOOC  Twitter feed.

Additional resources are listed at the end of the slide deck.  Stay connected and continue to  share your learning.

~Mark

Social Media as a Writing Tool

The other day I happened to catch a segment of The Current CBC broadcast as I was driving between school appointments. The topic was big data based the book Dataclysm, which certainly captivated my interest for a variety of reasons.

Dataclysm book cover

              Image from Amazon.com

I happened to tune in just at the moment the discussion was focused on analyzing data written in social media, Twitter in this case.   While many view social media communications as somewhat inane,  an in depth analysis reveals some interesting facts.

140-1

  • writing tends to be more sophisticated
  • word length is 20% longer
  • lexical density ,  the proportion  of meaning carrying words, is  higher than in many other forms of writing (email, magazines etc.  – perhaps opposite to what you would think)
  • with a limitation on the number of characters per message or post, 140 in this case,  people learn to improve word choices
  • in turn,  this improves editing skills

In the interview,  Christian commented that this type of analysis can and has been repeated.   This is not an isolated ‘one time’ look at this area.

When one considers the writing benefits summarized here,  I believe there is a strong case to incorporate  the social media writing medium in the school system.   Of course there are natural connections to digital citizenship, engagement, real world audiences etc.

140-2

As a classroom educator,  if you are already doing this, keep going!  If not,  consider giving it a try with an age appropriate system, a collaborative document with simulated limits  or even  offline.

Related Resources

Listen to the  CBC Podcast  with Christian Rudder on Dataclysm

Book:  Dataclysm  by Christian Rudder

Have a comment?   Please share.

~Mark

Ottawa GAFE presentation resources

Well,  it is Saturday morning, up early after a long drive  and feeling honoured to attend and present at the Ottawa GAFE  (Google Apps For Educators)  Summit  with  Andrew Bieronski.  This summit is the first ever bilingual #gafesummit and has over 1200  educators participating.  I am certainly looking forward to a great weekend of learning and sharing.

Today’s post shares the presentation resource for  our  Ottawa GAFE presentation.

Check out the video of our presentation:

~Mark

ECOO interviews OSSEMOOC

Check out this  Google Hangout interview with  ECOO  project manager  Michelle Cordy  and  OSSEMOOC  project co-leads  Donna Miller Fry  and  Mark W. Carbone.

Take a moment to learn more about  OSSEMOOC  and find out about some of the  plans for 14/15.

~Mark

Connected Learners Need Connected Leaders

TEDxLogoHHSS2

Todays connected learners need connected school and system leaders.  Further to the presentation prepared for  TEDxKitchenerED about the work that is/needs to be done in the area of personally owned,  self directed learning opportunities for school/school board leaders to build awareness and capacity in this area,  Donna & I are pleased to announce that the  official TEDx video is now online.

 

~Mark