Tag Archives: @markwcarbone

Purposeful Connecting

As I was reviewing materials for some upcoming presentation, I was struck by the insightfulness Silvana Hoxha shared in the interview I did with her in preparation for an OSSEMOOC submission to the K12 Online Conference.

I am confident that you will find Silvana’s message inspiring. Grab a comfy chair and enjoy the message she has to share.

Related Resources

Connected Learners Need Connected Leaders – an Ontario Perspective. (K12 Online Conference Submission)

TEDx Talk by Mark W. Carbone & Donna Miller Fry
(TEDxKitchenerED: Connected Learners Need Connected Leaders)

~Mark

Leveraging the Room

Last week I had the opportunity to attend an OASBO session where the main topic was succession planning.  The discussion started with considering communication processes in a simply way:  transmitters and receivers.

Now, move this idea to a mentor/coaching relationship between two people.  We were asked to divide ourselves into groups of three to tackle the task of listing attributes you would want to have in your mentor/coach.

crowd_source

         Image via www.socialbrite.org

I decided to see what would happen if we crowd sourced answers to this question. I popped the question out onto twitter hoping that some of my PLN would spot the request and take a moment to respond. The plan worked great as I received a number of responses during the work time allotted.

By happenstance our group was chosen to report back first.  One of my colleagues reported back on our strategy.  I wished I had recorded the reaction in the room as our approach was described (gasp, shock, what?, we didn’t ‘do the work’, you can’t do that). The guest presenter went with the situation as he was quite interested in our approach.

what they said 2

          Image via: chesapeakeadd.com

Here are the PLN responses to the question:  What makes a good mentor/coach?

  • engagement
  • vision
  • empathy
  • credibility
  • respect for the people they lead
  • active listener
  • humility
  • courage
  • geniousness
  • openness
  • accessible
  • transparent (honest, no hidden agendas)
  • relationship builder

People were impressed with the quality of thoughtful responses of the  PLN generated answers.  Additional responses from the session members included knowledge, flexible, sympathy, empathy and show confidence in others.

The facilitator added

  • being a sounding board (note importance of just listening … (you don’t always need an answer)
  • an objective view: a fresh set of eyes and
  • accountability in process

All in all a great list of important qualities for a mentor or coach to have.  Plus, it was a great impromptu demonstration of leveraging yourPLN.

Many thanks to PLN members   @EdDoadt,   @KentManning,  @ispgrew,  @alanacallan,   @mstayica,   @sheilashauf,  @fryed,  @jp_payeur,  @heidi_hobson and  @LAndriessen  for taking time to respond and contribute to a great learning experience.

~Mark

Strategy Institute Presentation Resources

Today’s post shares the resources being used in a presentation at the Education Technology Summit with Lorie Hough.

~Mark

Thinking About Professional Learning

Reblog from  OSSEMOOC.

If you were not able to join us live this evening,  the session recording is now available [here].  A summary of some of the thinking we shared, and some of the questions that arose from the discussion are captured below.  Please feel free to continue the conversation in the comments.

I’m not sure we answered any of the questions we used as provocations this evening, but the discussion was rich, and it led to more questions.

We began with this question:

“How does a shift occur from a mindset where learning is provided to a culture where learning is sought?”

This applies to students and teachers.  It’s a big shift!  But we are seeing a critical mass now believing that this must go forward.  Consider this link shared this evening: http://mltsfilm.org/

Or, consider this story about China telling its students to quit school: http://zhaolearning.com/2015/01/22/china-encourages-college-students-to-suspend-study-and-become-entrepreneurs-and-innovators/ .

Raghava KK spoke eloquently on this very topic last weekend at #Educon.

Agency, or ownership of learning, is a powerful concept when we consider both student and adult/educator learning.

We know that parents need to be involved in the shift.  They are products of a system built in the 1800’s, but it is the system they trust.  How do we bring them into the conversation of what education needs to look like in the year 2015?  How do we address their concerns about “preparation for high school” and “preparation for university”?

Is the inertia of higher education a brick wall preventing change? Is the focus on marks as the filter for higher education opportunity stifling learning?

What is the importance and impact of “tradition” on the work we are doing in trying to change to a culture of learning?

Student teachers exist in the higher education system.  How does this affect their thinking about what education can be?

We hear university professors complain that students don’t have the critical thinking skills they expect, yet the entry filter into university is a two digit number that may have nothing to do with critical thinking skills.

Will our elementary students in Ontario today be the drivers of change?  Will they stand up for quality opportunities for inquiry over memorization and test taking?  Will they resist a system that forces them to memorize answers instead of encouraging them to ask questions?

How much curiosity will they be able to retain?

How can we disrupt the thinking around professional learning.  Do we need a new name for PD days?  What might that look like?

PL (Professional Learning) Day? SD (Self-Directed) Day? PLC Day?

Do you believe that all educator professional learning should be directed by what knowledge and skills the data indicate that students need to succeed (i.e., that all professional learning is based on student learning needs)?

Can professional learning be based on the passions of the educator?

Are you working in an environment where your colleagues challenge your practice to make you think deeply about what you are doing?

Are we valuing professional capital (Fullan and Hargreaves) enough?  Sal Khan says that the nations who will be strong in the future are those who have nurtured innovation and creativity among their people, as we shift from and industrial to an information society (http://mltsfilm.org/).

Do you think that “Professional Development” creates a culture of learned helplessness? Have we taught educators to wait for someone to teach them?

Have we done the same for our students?

Is this the only PD really needed: “The opportunity to learn where to find something when we need to learn about it”?

If we want kids to explore and learn, why would we sit back and wait for someone to teach us?

Should schools create a culture of teacher-learner agency?

(From Wikipedia, “In the social sciences, agency is the capacity of individuals to act independently and to make their own free choices”.)

We’d love to hear your thinking about this.  Feel free to comment, and please join us live next Tuesday at 8 p.m. EST for more thinking and learning on this topic.  More details will be posted at the OSSEMOOC site.

CMA: Connecting more dots

Yesterday I had a chance to hear Simon Breakspear (@simonbreakspear) deliver his “Learning Redesigned” presentation. I thought the dive into deeper learning for all, and HOW was brilliant and thought provoking.

I have shared a simplified sketch of few key elements of the CMA model from my notability musings.

CMA

I am really interested in what Simon identified as three key aspects of change:  start small,  move fast, and  iterate frequently. Clearly, these are aspects of change that big organizations such as K12 institutions do not excel at.   As I was reflecting on his message over the day, I got to thinking about other connections within the K12 structure.

I don’t see this insight limited to learning and instructional practice. IT departments need to operate in this way too.  I can envision many benefits of striking more quickly with technology change and implementation – especially with the ever increasing rate of digital change.  The rapid iteration notion would apply to developing support models, tweaking networks for optimum performance and perhaps dynamic agile assignment of people resources to deal with trending needs re help-desk support models etc.

I wonder if the real quest is for instructional change & digital change to be working through this process at the same time for a more harmonious, rapid and positive change.

I love the AMPLIFY element of Simon’s model. There is no replacement for nurturing others, starting conversations and sharing your thinking and learning. PERIOD.  As part of the go forward process, in my view it is critical that we, yes we – all of us, take the time to share our experiences in ways that are findable, sharable and provide forums for comments and questions: blogs, videos, chats etc. – we must leverage the learnings from the journeys we each experience.

~Mark

Quest 2014: Innovative Practices

Last week I had the privilege of participating on a panel discussion at the YRDSB’s Quest conference  with Lewis Morgulis (DCDSB) and Russ Coles (YRDSB).  The panel was  moderated by Margaret Roberts (YRDSB).  I appreciate that, with permission,  we were able to livestream and record the session to offer a virtual learning opportunity to other interested educators.

Quest2014_logo

The panel discussion was centred around four guiding questions:

  • What is innovation in a K-12 context?
  • Share an example where innovation has been successfully implemented?
  • What were the elements that made your example successful?
  • What were the challenges?

Watch the panel session.

Following the panel discussion, participants engaged in table discussion guided by the question and statement  set below.

  • What does innovation look like, sound like, feel like?
  • share personal examples
  • How do you engage staff that are resistant to change?
  • How do you build a culture where change is accepted and embraced?
  • Identify barriers and potential solutions

Participants also added comments, ideas and questions to a Today’s Meeting back channel.  I have shared three quotes that resonated with me below.

Russ: thinking outside the box while living in the box

Mary-Anne: innovation starts when we stop accepting the status quo

Donna Miller Fry: (virtually from TBay)  Innovation requires a willingness to be distrubed by M. Wheatley

Do you find these quotes & ideas intriguing?   Check out the full session transcript  [here]  from the Todays Meet  collaboration space.

The closing comment spoke for itself:  As a result of your learning today, what would you do to start to implement this in your own context?

Please share your innovation ideas!

~Mark

BIT14 Presentation Resources

It was a pleasure for me to team up with  Jennifer Paziuk  to present on  Innovative Learning Opportunities. As promised, we are sharing the session resources.

Futures Forum Project -June 28, 2013  from  WRDSB Learning Services  on  Vimeo.

Additional blog articles about the  WRDSB Futures Forum Project.

~Mark & Jennifer