Purposeful Connecting

As I was reviewing materials for some upcoming presentation, I was struck by the insightfulness Silvana Hoxha shared in the interview I did with her in preparation for an OSSEMOOC submission to the K12 Online Conference.

I am confident that you will find Silvana’s message inspiring. Grab a comfy chair and enjoy the message she has to share.

Related Resources

Connected Learners Need Connected Leaders – an Ontario Perspective. (K12 Online Conference Submission)

TEDx Talk by Mark W. Carbone & Donna Miller Fry
(TEDxKitchenerED: Connected Learners Need Connected Leaders)

~Mark

Virtual Sharing with ADSB

I experienced a wonderful virtual learning opportunity this week with some fantastic educators from ADSB.  Donna Fry, who was leading the learning sessions on site, invited me to provide a kick off presentation to their day.  My task was to ignite some change thinking by linking the areas of technology enabled learning, technology change and bringing collaboration into eLearning.

virtual keynote

virtualkeynotescreen

I loved the idea of doing a virtual keynote – what a perfect way to “walk the talk” in terms of connected learning and modelling what we need our students to do.

While there are a variety of tools one could use for this type of activity, we settled on Google Hangouts (GHO) for our session.

 

Of course, the technology all worked flawlessly <big grin!> – a good demonstration of technology creating a natural flow of sharing.

 

I really enjoyed being able to participate in a timed table talk opportunity following my presentation as Donna kindly relocated me from the “big screen” to the table.

I was certainly struck by the power of this. We collectively decided that this was a virtual F2F learning session.

ADSB_table_talk

Linking back to the theme of the day and my task with the opening kick off, I could envision a day when virtual F2F learning opportunities are normalized into  learning environments.  I look forward to learning with these educators as they develop their connecting and collaborating strategies.

~Mark

Resources:

Learn more about the background of the Futures Forum Project.

On the ground with Futures Forum.

SAMR examples from OSAPAC.

SAMR as a growth model

SAMR on scoop.it

Leveraging the Room

Last week I had the opportunity to attend an OASBO session where the main topic was succession planning.  The discussion started with considering communication processes in a simply way:  transmitters and receivers.

Now, move this idea to a mentor/coaching relationship between two people.  We were asked to divide ourselves into groups of three to tackle the task of listing attributes you would want to have in your mentor/coach.

crowd_source

         Image via www.socialbrite.org

I decided to see what would happen if we crowd sourced answers to this question. I popped the question out onto twitter hoping that some of my PLN would spot the request and take a moment to respond. The plan worked great as I received a number of responses during the work time allotted.

By happenstance our group was chosen to report back first.  One of my colleagues reported back on our strategy.  I wished I had recorded the reaction in the room as our approach was described (gasp, shock, what?, we didn’t ‘do the work’, you can’t do that). The guest presenter went with the situation as he was quite interested in our approach.

what they said 2

          Image via: chesapeakeadd.com

Here are the PLN responses to the question:  What makes a good mentor/coach?

  • engagement
  • vision
  • empathy
  • credibility
  • respect for the people they lead
  • active listener
  • humility
  • courage
  • geniousness
  • openness
  • accessible
  • transparent (honest, no hidden agendas)
  • relationship builder

People were impressed with the quality of thoughtful responses of the  PLN generated answers.  Additional responses from the session members included knowledge, flexible, sympathy, empathy and show confidence in others.

The facilitator added

  • being a sounding board (note importance of just listening … (you don’t always need an answer)
  • an objective view: a fresh set of eyes and
  • accountability in process

All in all a great list of important qualities for a mentor or coach to have.  Plus, it was a great impromptu demonstration of leveraging yourPLN.

Many thanks to PLN members   @EdDoadt,   @KentManning,  @ispgrew,  @alanacallan,   @mstayica,   @sheilashauf,  @fryed,  @jp_payeur,  @heidi_hobson and  @LAndriessen  for taking time to respond and contribute to a great learning experience.

~Mark

Strategy Institute Presentation Resources

Today’s post shares the resources being used in a presentation at the Education Technology Summit with Lorie Hough.

~Mark

Your choice?

I often listen to the morning CBC KW broadcast hosted by Craig Norris on the way into work.  Recently Craig had a piece on the show about an app called Yik Yak that caught my attention.

Wikipedia describes Yik Yak as an app that “allows people to anonymously create and view “Yaks” within a 10 mile radius …. for sharing primarily with those in close proximity to the user, potentially making it more intimate and relevant for people reading the posts.  All users have the ability to contribute to the stream by writing, responding, and liking or disliking yaks.” Read more detail [here] .

yak2

      Image from http://services.flikie.com/

Hmmm … location based,  anonymous,  instant messaging … It doesn’t take much pondering to recognize the huge potential for misuse.

But,  it doesn’t have to be that way.  Each of us has choices to make, personal responsibility and accountability for our actions.  One could choose to share positive thoughts, ideas, comments, compliments etc.  through this type of service.   Why not?

What choice would you make when using this service?

Other Resources

The CBC article and interviews.

10 things to know about Yik Yak

Digital Citizenship resources developed by OSAPAC.

30 Days of THINK.

~Mark

Thinking About Professional Learning

Reblog from  OSSEMOOC.

If you were not able to join us live this evening,  the session recording is now available [here].  A summary of some of the thinking we shared, and some of the questions that arose from the discussion are captured below.  Please feel free to continue the conversation in the comments.

I’m not sure we answered any of the questions we used as provocations this evening, but the discussion was rich, and it led to more questions.

We began with this question:

“How does a shift occur from a mindset where learning is provided to a culture where learning is sought?”

This applies to students and teachers.  It’s a big shift!  But we are seeing a critical mass now believing that this must go forward.  Consider this link shared this evening: http://mltsfilm.org/

Or, consider this story about China telling its students to quit school: http://zhaolearning.com/2015/01/22/china-encourages-college-students-to-suspend-study-and-become-entrepreneurs-and-innovators/ .

Raghava KK spoke eloquently on this very topic last weekend at #Educon.

Agency, or ownership of learning, is a powerful concept when we consider both student and adult/educator learning.

We know that parents need to be involved in the shift.  They are products of a system built in the 1800’s, but it is the system they trust.  How do we bring them into the conversation of what education needs to look like in the year 2015?  How do we address their concerns about “preparation for high school” and “preparation for university”?

Is the inertia of higher education a brick wall preventing change? Is the focus on marks as the filter for higher education opportunity stifling learning?

What is the importance and impact of “tradition” on the work we are doing in trying to change to a culture of learning?

Student teachers exist in the higher education system.  How does this affect their thinking about what education can be?

We hear university professors complain that students don’t have the critical thinking skills they expect, yet the entry filter into university is a two digit number that may have nothing to do with critical thinking skills.

Will our elementary students in Ontario today be the drivers of change?  Will they stand up for quality opportunities for inquiry over memorization and test taking?  Will they resist a system that forces them to memorize answers instead of encouraging them to ask questions?

How much curiosity will they be able to retain?

How can we disrupt the thinking around professional learning.  Do we need a new name for PD days?  What might that look like?

PL (Professional Learning) Day? SD (Self-Directed) Day? PLC Day?

Do you believe that all educator professional learning should be directed by what knowledge and skills the data indicate that students need to succeed (i.e., that all professional learning is based on student learning needs)?

Can professional learning be based on the passions of the educator?

Are you working in an environment where your colleagues challenge your practice to make you think deeply about what you are doing?

Are we valuing professional capital (Fullan and Hargreaves) enough?  Sal Khan says that the nations who will be strong in the future are those who have nurtured innovation and creativity among their people, as we shift from and industrial to an information society (http://mltsfilm.org/).

Do you think that “Professional Development” creates a culture of learned helplessness? Have we taught educators to wait for someone to teach them?

Have we done the same for our students?

Is this the only PD really needed: “The opportunity to learn where to find something when we need to learn about it”?

If we want kids to explore and learn, why would we sit back and wait for someone to teach us?

Should schools create a culture of teacher-learner agency?

(From Wikipedia, “In the social sciences, agency is the capacity of individuals to act independently and to make their own free choices”.)

We’d love to hear your thinking about this.  Feel free to comment, and please join us live next Tuesday at 8 p.m. EST for more thinking and learning on this topic.  More details will be posted at the OSSEMOOC site.

One Word for 2015

I must admit I was intrigued by this tweet when I saw it, and I have been mulling over the notion of picking ‘a word’ to focus my 2015 efforts.

OneWordTweet

In considering this, I recognized that actually getting possible choices down to just one word would indeed be a challenge. I began to think about short phases, pairs of words with dashes or underscores linking them to one.  Well,  you-get- the_ picture.

Knowing this was the open mic discussion topic for OSSEMOOC tonight, I had settled on “model” as my word.  I think it is important to model what you seek.  Some key elements on my list include:

  • connected leading & learning
  • listening
  • seeking understanding and
  • problem solving to name a few.

This morning at our system leaders meeting we watched this TED Talk by Onora O’Neill

to kick off a discussion about deepening our understanding of trust. This topic seemed to solidify my choice to model.  Add trust to the list.

I have settled on and shared my word: “model”.   What is your word? Please share!

OneWordGraphic

~Mark

Connect, Learn, Reflect, Share: Make a Difference Today

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